Landscape in transition? Climate change and disturbance regimes in Greater Yellowstone

Ecology and Evolution seminar / Storer Life Sciences Endownment, Major Issues in Modern Biology lecture

Monica Turner,  University of Wisconsin
Landscape in transition? Climate change and disturbance regimes in Greater Yellowstone
Thursday, February 26, 4:10 – 5:30 pm
1003 Giedt Hall

Professor Turner is internationally recognized for her precedent setting research in landscape ecology, which emphasizes causes and consequences of spatial heterogeneity in ecological systems, focusing primarily on forest ecosystems. She has conducted research on disturbance regimes, vegetation dynamics, nutrient cycling, and climate change in Greater Yellowstone for over 25 years, including long-term studies of the 1988 Yellowstone Fires. Other current research examines how climate change may alter the frequency of large fires and, in turn, change vegetation patterns and carbon storage across landscapes of the northern Rocky Mountains. Turner also studies land-water interactions in Wisconsin, effects of current and past land use on Southern Appalachian forest landscapes, and spatial patterns of ecosystem services. She has published over 220 scientific papers; authored or edited six books, including LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY IN THEORY AND PRACTICE; and is co-editor in chief of ECOSYSTEMS. Turner was elected to the US National Academy of Sciences in 2004, and she received both the ECI Prize in Terrestrial Ecology and the Ecological Society of America’s Robert H. MacArthur Award in 2008. She is currently President-elect of the Ecological Society of America.

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